Artist Turns Driftwood Into Striking Sculptures That Capture The Beauty Of Nature


When most of us pass by an old piece of wood on the ground, we don’t look at it twice. After all, it’s just a stick, right?

But for Canadian artist Debra Bernier, the grooves, pits, and breaks in a piece of driftwood are tiny works of art, created by nature, and they’re inspirational jumping-off points for her earthy, magical artwork.

She adds to the driftwood pieces by carving in images of human and animal forms, creating sculptures that have a mystical, timeless quality. Inspired by nature, animals, and her children, Bernier’s work is a celebration of the natural world and humans’ relationship to it.

“The finished pieces are a reflection of not only my life, my family, and children, but of an eternal, sacred connection we all share with nature,” she says.

Wood is a naturally beautiful material that provides endless inspiration to artists, crafters, and designers. Whether it’s being carved into realistic sculptures or simply used as a canvas for paintings, it’s always full of unique beauty.

Bernier uses that beauty, as well as the natural wear and tear from the elements, as inspiration for her sculptures. Sometimes she also adds to the wood with other natural materials like shells or clay for even more detail.

Check out her artwork below, and the next time you see a piece of driftwood or a gnarled old branch, stop and look at it for a moment. You might just get inspired!

  1. 1

    artFido
    3

  2. 2

    artFido
    2

  3. 3

    artFido
    2

  4. 4

    artFido
    2

  5. 5

    artFido
    1

  6. 6

    artFido
    1

  7. 7

    artFido
    1

  8. 8

    artFido
    1

  9. 9

    artFido
    1

  10. 10

    artFido
    0


10.7k shares

0 Comments

Join the artFido Newsletter

artFido’s videos and content are viewed more than 2.5 billion times a month. This makes the network the seventh most viewed media company in the online sphere, behind the Walt Disney company in sixth place, and in front of US media giant Comcast in eighth place.*
* Statistics provided by research group Tubular Labs